Valle Laguna Book Club March Review

Valle Laguna Book Club March Review

 

If ever we needed some escapism it’s now.

Self-isolation might be the perfect opportunity to catch up on books, but even without guest here, there are still plenty of jobs to do here at the farm. We’ve taken the opportunity to get out in the garden, and tick off the odd jobs that somehow never find their way onto the official “To Do” list.

I set my Bluetooth Speaker up outside and listen while I’m doing the odd jobs or pottering in the gardening.

This is what I’ve been reading, watching & listening to over the last few weeks.

I hope it goes a small way to relieving any anxiety, boredom or sadness you may be dealing with at the moment.

Kylie

Reading:

The Girl Who Lived by  Christopher Greyson

Psychological thriller. Twist and turns. A number of moments that are so suspenseful my heart was racing and my breath was shallow…  I didn’t pick the killer until it was revealed at the end. Normally this would be a good thing but I was a little disappointed because there weren’t enough “ah ha” moments throughout the plot to make me think “Of Couse! Why didn’t I see that coming?”  That said I still recommend reading it.

The Girl in The Painting by Tea Cooper

Tea Cooper is a local of the Wolombi Valley. Why have I not read her books before?? This book is absolutely fantastic!!!!

I particularly loved one of the main characters, Jane Piper. She’s described as a “mathematical savant” and has a somewhat quirky personality so she provides the perfect contrast to the more controlled and traditional character of Elizabeth.

I can’t really think how to describe this book so here is what Harper Collins had to say

Ranging from the gritty reality of the Australian goldfields to the grand institutions of Sydney, the bucolic English countryside to the charm of Maitland Town, this compelling historical mystery in the company of an eccentric and original heroine is rich with atmosphere and detail.

A few months ago I started to read another book by Tea Cooper called The Naturalist Daughter, but I couldn’t get into it so I put it aside. I was disappointed because it’s set in the Wollombi Valley and I was keen to get an insight to what our valley looked like back then. Anyway I’ve started reading it again and I can report that I’m hooked!

Less By Andrew Sean Greer

Despite all of the hype around this book, I’ve put it aside for now. I just found the main character a bit to irritating for my headspace at the moment…I will revisit and let you know how I go. Anyone else read it?

Apps:

Calm.

I love this app so much!! I started using the free version a few years ago but quickly upgraded to the paid version. It has a new 10-minute mediation each day; sleep stories, guided meditations of varying lengths and so much more. The soundscapes are also very relaxing…rain falling, fire crackling, thunderstorms, or waves gently breaking on the beach.

 

Watching on Netflix:

The Goop Lab- Better than I expected.

Miss Americana- Even if you don’t listen to Taylor Swift’s music this is a MUST WATCH.

Virgin River- Romantic escapism…defiantly one for the ladies.

 

YouTube:

Yoga with Adrienne

Cole Chance Yoga

Podcasts:

The Food Medic-Dr. Hazel Wallace discusses all thing heath related, with a focus on fact verses fiction.

How I Built This with Guy Raz- Interviews with people who have built some of the worlds most successful companies.  Many set out to build big companies, others slowly evolve and a few just take off leaving even the founders baffled.

 

January 2020- Fire Fatigue

It rained overnight and it’s been cool and overcast all day. This change in weather has caused me to feel a little bit emotional. It’s a good kind of emotional. I’ve coined a new phrase that I’m calling “Fire Fatigue”. On the 30th November I posted the picture below on my Facebook page with a caption saying something about betting emotional at the sight of the trucks lined up and ready to defend our beautiful Wollombi Valley. Little did I know that over the next few weeks my emotions would be under siege just like our valley! 

Fast forward to today and I’m feeling immensely grateful. I have enormous appreciation for the RFS in the work they did during the fires, and in the weeks leading up to the fires. I’m humbled by the support that our community has shown towards each other, and thankful that no lives were lost, and that so many properties were saved.

Mentally I had prepared myself for ember attack, raging fire, strong winds and intense heat.  Thankfully nothing like that came close to us. Instead all the reports were that the fire was moving slowly and that it was just creeping along the ground. Heavy smoke filled the valley and we spent most of our time inside watching and waiting. .

Ready to fight spot fires.
Burnt leaves fell around us but they were cold so not any threat
Heavy smoke kept us inside most of the time.

The “Fire Fatigue” that I mentioned was fed by images like the one below. I can’t tell you how many times I checked my phone every day…hundreds wouldn’t be exaggerating. The Fires Near Me App and media reports made me feel even more stressed, because it was like living in a strange parallel universe, the information didn’t actually reflect what was happening “on the ground” at the farm. 

Thankfully the weather Gods were on our side. The wind came from the south and pushed the fire to the north, and away from us. I was relieved, but it was little consolation as the fire was now heading towards someone else. Not really the win we had hoped for.

Lemon Rush

Not sure about everyone else, but I’m ready for the warmer weather to start. I’ve just about cooked everything in my winter repertoire and my taste buds are ready for a change! Is it just me or do we all seem to stick with the tried an tested recipes? I think it’s a time/effort scenario. In winter if I can cook it in bulk and freeze leftovers I’m happy, or just throw everything in the pan and let it cook by itself. I’ll sometimes try a new variation-but mostly it’s the same dish just re-worked. Lamb shanks got a re-work this year. Traditionally I’ve gone the Italian route with a tomato base sauce, but this year I was into the Moroccan spices. You can find my recipe in list above or in a previous post here. The addition of dried apricots, prunes and chickpeas made for a nice change in many of the Moroccan dishes I tried, but the one I really loved was the preserved lemons. The sharp fresh flavour of the lemons was just so good. Sharp & fresh aren’t usually words you associate with winter cooking. Anyway we have an abundance of lemons this year so I thought I’d give it a go and preserve some of our lemons.
This is a recipe based on the one in Stephanie Alexander’s book “The Cooks Companion”

Preserved Lemons & Lemon Curd
Preserved Lemons
250g Coarse Kitchen Salt
10 Lemons, washed and cut into quarters
1 Bay Leaf
2-3 Cloves
extra lemon juice
Place a spoon full of salt into a sterilised jar (approx.1 litre capacity)
In a separate dish mix the lemons and salt. Stephanie suggested massaging the skin…I think this would have been easier before I’d cut the lemons.
Place the lemon quarters into the jar along with the bay leaf and cloves. Press down on the lemons as you go to release as much juice as possible. I found that squeezing each piece as I put it into the jar helped released more juice. Place any leftover salt into the jar along with the extra lemon juice. The idea is that the lemons are covered by the juice. I found that I was a little short on the juice so I topped it up with some boiling water. I also added 2 extra teaspoons of salt so that the brine remained salty enough.
In every recipe that I’ve read they always mention that if the lemons are not covered by the brine they can develop a white mould on them. Apparently its harmless-it just looks yuck!You can probably see from the picture of mine that because the jar wasn’t packed tight with lemons so when I added the extra water they floated to the top. I’m not sure if this is going to effect the end result-we’ll just have to wait and see. I did get a tip from my friend Natalie from at Moore Farm Fresh Produce. She sliced her lemons so they sat flat in the jar. This allowed her to stack them up to the top of the jar. Clever! I think I’ll try this next time.

Winter Update for the Villa

As I’ve said before, winter is my favourite time in the Hunter Valley.  A few days spent relaxing in front of the fire with a good book can do amazing things for the soul. The villa is totally prepared for  winter. The wood is stacked up ready for the fire, winter weight doonas and soft blankets are now on the bed’s and we’ve re stocked the book shelf with new books and magazines.

If you feel like a weekend away in the beautiful Hunter Valley drop me an e-mail. Weekends fill up fast, but don’t forget about the mid-week option. Rates are lower and availability is easier.

 
 
 

Winter Weekend

Heading back from our afternoon walk and we caught the last rays of daylight just before the sun dipped behind the hills.



Another perfect weekend here in the Hunter Valley. For the first weekend in ages we didn’t have any specific plans. It was  actually lovely to take life at a much slower pace for a change. I rode my horses, we caught up with friends and took the dogs for a long afternoon walk. Total rest and relaxation!
It also meant that I had time to potter in the kitchen. I had  Moroccan Lamb Shanks simmering away on the stove for most of Saturday afternoon. So delicious and so easy. I’ve put the recipe below.
I also made a batch of Paris Butter. Have you tried it? It’s similar to a herb butter but with a few extra ingredients. Well worth the effort I must say. Once you made it you can keep it in the freezer for a few weeks.  A small knob on top of a beautifully cook steak is just out of this world. Also great to add to a bowl of steamed vegetables or boiled potatoes. Plain food is my nemesis…I know adding butter to steamed vegetables is counter productive but  you really just need a tiny bit….or so I keep telling myself!

Speaking of food! I’m looking forward to this upcoming weekend. We have the “Taste of Wollombi” food & wine festival happening on Sunday. It will show case all of the wonderful food and wine producers in our little valley. It’s an easy drive from Sydney or Newcastle so it’s a perfect day out. Hopefully this stunning winter weather will continue and it will be a big day for the local community. I’ve added the link below if you need a bit more information. Hope you are all having a great week so far.

Moroccan Lamb Shanks

1 tablespoon of olive oil
4 Lamb shanks
1 large leek, finely chopped
2 carrots, peeled, coarsely chopped
3 garlic cloves, crushed
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1L Chicken stock** 
600g  sweet potato (kumera) peeled, coarsely chopped
1 x 400g can chick peas, rinsed, drained
12 dried apricots roughly chopped
Fresh coriander to serve.
** I didn’t have liquid stock so I used stock powder with boiling water and it was perfectly fine.


Here’s how it’s done.

Heat the oil in a flameproof casserole dish (one with a lid) over medium heat. Add the lamb shanks and cook for a few minutes. Turn them a few times so they are brown all over. You don’t want to actually “cook” then just brown them. Once they are brown transfer them to a plate.

Add the onion, carrot and garlic to the dish and stir until combined. Add the cumin, turmeric, paprika and cinnamon. Stir together for about 30 seconds. Add a small amount of stock to the pan and stir to release any of the browned lamb that may have caught on the bottom of the dish. Add the remaining stock. Return the lamb shanks to the pan. Put the lid on and cook over a very low heat for about 1 1/2 hours. The pan should be only just simmering. If the liquid is evaporating during this time add some boiling water.

Finally add the sweet potatoes, chick peas and dried apricots. Turn the heat up to medium and cook for a further 30 minutes. Remove from the heat and rest for 10 minutes.

Serve the lamb shanks on a bed of couscous with some of the delicious sauce and sprinkled with coriander. Enjoy!

Note: I’ve cooked a few variation of this dish. It’s also great with lentils and prunes. Just depends what I have in the cupboard. I also great served with brown rice.